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Learn More About Working With Seismic Hazard Analysis

EZ-FRISK™ Technical Capabilities

Seismic Sources

Seismic Source Databases

EZ-FRISK™ lets you work with one or more seismic source databases. These databases can store:

You can easily include seismic sources in your seismic hazard analyses from one or more databases and from one or more regions of those databases. We give you tools to conveniently select all sources in a region, to select all sources in a region within a specified distance, or to individually select seismic sources.

By using a database separate from your analyses, you can update custom source data in one location. Any subsequent computations will use the new source parameters. Consequently, you can update previous analyses by simplying recalculating the results.

We provide you with a seismic model for your licensed region. In regions like the USA and Canada where seismic models are publically available, you are free to view and change all aspects of the model. Elsewhere, Fugro Consultants has developed proprietary models. When working with a proprietary model, you can view all aspects of the model, but you can not copy or change sources.

Fault Seismic Sources

To define a fault seismic source, you can specify:

For each fault you can define multiple, weighted models of magnitude recurrence.

Subduction Slab Seismic Sources

To define a subduction slab seismic source, you can specify:

For each fault you can define multiple, weighted models of magnitude recurrence.

Subduction Interface Seismic Sources

To define a subduction interface seismic source, you can specify:

For each fault you can define multiple, weighted models of magnitude recurrence.

Area Seismic Sources

Area seismic sources, sometimes referred to as seismic zones, are often defined where specific fault data are not known, but seismicity does exist. Area sources assume that the rate of occurrence is uniform throughout. Therefore, every location within the area has equal probability that an event will occur.

To define an area seismic source, or a zone, you can specify:

The magnitude recurrence rate for all area sources is assumed to be exponential.

Variable Seismicity Gridded Sources

Variable seismicity gridded sources are used by the USGS and other organizations as an alternative to seismic zonation. Given an earthquake catalog, variable seismic sources calculate seismicity for a particular location by applying a Gaussian filter to the historical seismicity. For computational purposes, the seismicity is assigned to a set of grid points at even increments of latitude and longitude.

Typically, end users will not created gridded sources, but the program has a complete interface for view and editing gridded sources.

The magnitude recurrence rate for all gridded sources is assumed to be exponential or pure characteristic.

Clustered Seismic Sources

Clustered seismic sources are used to represent sets of faults where the event rates of the separate sources are not independent. For example, this technique is used in the USGS 2008 National Seismic Hazard map to model hazard from the New Madrid seismic zone.

Composite Seismic Sources

Composite seismic sources allow grouping of multiple related seismic sources into a single source for reporting purposes. Often it is necessary to use multiple logical seismic sources to represent all of the logic tree branches for a single conceptual seismic sources. A composite seismic source allows the hazard from these logical seismic sources to be presented as a single source in reports and charts.